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The 5 Best Mickey Guyton Songs, So Far

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Mickey Guyton's achieved quite a few firsts lately, from becoming the first Black woman nominated for a Grammy award in a solo country category (Best Country Solo Performance for "Black Like Me") to an historic co-hosting gig alongside Keith Urban for the upcoming 2021 ACM Awards. It's as if just about everyone in the music industry but country radio tastemakers rightfully uplift Guyton as a top-tier vocalist and songwriter.

Whether you're new to Guyton's music or have been along for the ride for years, check out this playlist of the Arlington, Texas native's five best country songs to date.

5. "Bridges"

Start with this snap-along song about building metaphorical bridges between people with political and social differences. It's not another paint-by-numbers "why can't we all just get along?" plea. Instead, Guyton admits there's a lot of work to be done, but it's necessary to improve our country and country music.

4. "Better Than You Left Me"

Guyton started strong out the gate with this, her debut single for Capitol Records Nashville. Guyton and co-writers Jennifer Hanson, Jen Schott and Nathan Chapman update the classic country story of a woman who's able to see how a failed relationship made her a better person.

The Top 40 release from 2015 is still Guyton's highest-charting single on the Billboard Country Airplay chart.

3. "Heaven Down Here"

Guyton juggles personal faith and the doubt that's inevitable when reminded of other folks' Earthly struggles with this Don Williams-esque prayer for a better day than yesterday.

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2. "What Are You Gonna Tell Her"

At a young age, Guyton saw LeAnn Rimes' success as a teenager as a sign that she, too, could become a country artist. Beyond country stardom being a harder climb than any child might assume, the obstacles faced by women in the country music business have proven time and again to be even crueler to Black women. With this powerful song, Guyton asks how she'd even begin to tell a young, Black dreamer that hard work only means so much on an uneven playing field.

1. "Black Like Me"

Guyton's embrace of country music's "three chords and the truth" roots brought us this instant classic, released while George Floyd's murder and the resulting Black Lives Matter protests of 2020 dominated headlines.

It, too, tells harsh truths about the discrimination and heartbreak Guyton's faced while chasing her country star dreams.

Honorable mention songs: "Sister," "Hold On" and "Why Baby Why"

CBS will air the 2021 Academy of Country Music Awards air on Sun., April 18. Guyton's a Best New Artist nominee.

"Black Like Me" Lyrics

Little kid in a small town
I did my best just to fit in
Broke my heart on the playground, mm
When they said I was different

Oh now, now I'm all grown up, and nothing has changed
Yeah, it's still the same

It's a hard life on easy street
Just white painted picket fences far as you can see
If you think we live in the land of the free
You should try to be black like me

My daddy worked day and night
For an old house and a used car, hm
Just to live that good life, mm
It shouldn't be twice as hard

Oh now, now I'm all grown up and nothing has changed
Yeah, it's still the same

It's a hard life on easy street
Just white painted picket fences far as you can see
If you think we live in the land of the free
You should try to be, oh, black like me

Oh, oh oh, oh
Oh, oh, oh
Oh, oh, oh, oh
Oh, oh, oh
Oh, I know I'm not the only one, oh yeah
Who feels like I, I don't belong

It's a hard life on easy street
Just white painted picket fences far as you can see
And if you think we live in the land of the free
Then you should try to be, oh, black like me

Oh, and someday we'll all be free
And I'm proud to be, oh, black like me
And I'm proud to be black like me
Proud to be black like me
Black like me

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The 5 Best Mickey Guyton Songs, So Far