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One of the Nation's Best Country Music Museums is in This Small Texas Town

source: Facebook/ Heart of Texas Country Music Museum

When you think of country music museums, you probably think of the Country Music Hall of Fame in Nashville, where Nudie suits sparkle at every turn and Webb Pierce's famous 1962 Pontiac Bonneville is parked. But in the Hill Country town of Brady, Texas is a much smaller, but equally dedicated museum that honors the first century of country music. The Heart of Texas Country Music Museum is one of the most impressive country music museums in the nation. And it all started with a rhinestone dress.

Hillbilly Hits

Disc jockey Tracy Pitcox, an announcer on Brady's KNEL, is a lifelong fan of country music. In fact, he started his radio show Hillbilly Hits when he was just 17. So when country legend Rose Maddox donated a gold rhinestone dress designed by Nathan Turk to the radio station, Pitcox knew the item should be preserved for future generations. He set out collecting more country music memorabilia, storing his finds in the KNEL offices. Soon, he was running out of room.

Pitcox opened the museum in 2000, transferring his collection of country music artifacts to the new 1,200-square-foot space. Eager to support an organization honoring traditional country music, country legends began donating stage costumes, guitars and other pieces of music history.

Today, the museum holds items from over 100 artists, from George Strait's Resistol hat to Buck Owens' guitar.

Hank Snow's guitar and stage clothes. Source: Heart of Texas Country Music Museum/ Facebook
Loretta Lynn's dress, shoes and jewelry. Source: Heart of Texas Country Music Museum
Lefty Frizzell's Nudie suit. Source: Heart of Texas Country Music Museum/ Facebook
Jim Reeves' stage clothes, guitar and more. Source: Heart of Texas Country Music Museum/ Facebook

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Faron Young was known for using his star power to boost the careers of fledging country songwriters. His 1961 recording of “Hello Walls” went to the top of Billboard’s country chart and peaked at 12 on the pop chart. It was the nation’s introduction to songwriter Willie Nelson. Nelson, short on cash, offered to sell the song outright to Young for $500. Young knew it would be a hit and instead gave Nelson a loan of $400 to tide him over. Six weeks later, Young had a royalty check of $20,000 for Nelson. According to Young, Nelson was so grateful for this influx of cash, he grabbed Young by the face and French-kissed him – “It was the best kiss I ever had,” says Young, “and we’ve been close ever since.” Visit the Heart of Texas Country Music Museum in Brady, TX! #heartoftexascountrymusicmuseum #hotmuseum #bradytx #faronyoung #willilenelson #hellowalls

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The museum displays pieces from Kitty Wells, Patsy Cline, Bob Wills, Faron Young, Ernest Tubb and more. In 2003, the museum purchased Jim Reeves tour bus "Big Blue" and offers a bus tour to visitors. According to Texas Highways, the museum is also home to an extremely rare Jimmie Rodgers record, a picture disc vinyl featuring "Cowhand's Last Ride."

Music from the heart of Texas

The museum is operated by the Heart of Texas Country Music Association, a group of over 800 volunteers. The association also operates Heart of Texas Records, an independent record label with Texas legends Darrell McCall and Johnny Bush on its roster. The label has released albums from Grand Ole Opry star Norma Jean, Texas traditionalist Justin Trevino, singer-songwriter Dallas Wayne and Georgette Jones, the daughter of George Jones and Tammy Wynette. Some of the artists on the Heart of Texas label have even relocated to the small town.

The Heart of Texas Country Music Association hosts a music festival in Brady every March.

The museum is open Fridays (2 p.m. to 4 p.m.),  Saturdays ( 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.) and Sundays (12 p.m. to 5 p.m.). Admission is free.

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One of the Nation's Best Country Music Museums is in This Small Texas Town