Music

Watch Miranda Lambert, Little Big Town Cover the Dixie Chicks’ ‘Goodbye Earl’

In mid-July when the Bandwagon Tour featuring Miranda Lambert and Little Big Town began in Charlotte, N.C. at the PNC Music Pavilion, the two pop-country favorites took the stage together to show off the collaborative effort of their tour. Thankfully, fans were recording when the co-headliners played the Dixie Chicks’ “Goodbye Earl” to a crowd who sang along to every word.

Karen Fairchild started off the vocals and Lambert, Kimberly Schlapman, Phillip Sweet and Jimmy Westbrook joined in on the iconic Dixie Chicks song that was released back in 1999 on their hit album Fly. After the Dixie Chicks recorded the track written by Dennis Linde, the dark tune made its way into the Top 20 of Billboard’s Hot 100 chart, a high pop ranking for the band. Though it only reached No. 13 on Billboard’s Hot Country Songs chart, the song remains one of their most beloved singles and music videos.

And if it sounds familiar that Lambert and Little Big Town collaborated on this track live, you might remember the moment when Little Big Town joined Lambert on stage last year in Tennessee. Lambert took the lead as Little Big Town harmonized. The duet took place on a Saturday night, also in July, inside Nashville’s Ryman Auditorium.

Read More: The Story Behind the Dixie Chicks’ Controversial Hit ‘Goodbye Earl’

Lambert and Little Big Town are certainly comfortable working with one another. This July in Charlotte, the co-headliners also sang “Lean On Me,” “Boondocks,” “Girl Crush,” and “Little Red Wagon” together. “Little Red Wagon” took on new heights as Little Big Town launched into a cover of Prince’s “Let’s Go Crazy” before returning back to Lambert’s song and closing out a high-energy jam session.

The Bandwagon Tour continues through the end of this month with the bands visiting Texas, Pennsylvania and Illinois.

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Watch Miranda Lambert, Little Big Town Cover the Dixie Chicks’ ‘Goodbye Earl’