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Dolly Parton's Imagination Library to be Subject of New Documentary

Tennessee Gov. Phil Bredesen, left, smiles as Dolly Parton reads to children Friday, June 18, 2004, in Pigeon Forge, Tenn. Bredesen joined Parton on Friday to announce Tennessee's adoption of her Imagination Library book program for preschoolers. Tennessee has committed $2 million to the program _ the first state to do so. (AP Photo/Wade Payne)

Dolly Parton's Imagination Library is the subject of the upcoming documentary The Library That Dolly Built, which premiers on April 2. The film showcases "the history, impact and future of Dolly Parton's world-wide book gifting program."

Directed and produced by Nick Geidner, a journalism professor at the University of Tennessee Knoxville, and narrated by Wonder Years star Danica McKellar, The Library That Dolly Built shows how Parton took the program from an idea to a life-changing organization.

Since the program launched in 1995 in Parton's home county of Sevier County, Tennessee, the Imagination Library has delivered over 135 million books to kids.

"Of all the things that I've done in my life, this is one of the most precious things," Parton says in the film's trailer.

The documentary will be in theaters for one day only -- April 2. For tickets, visit here. Fifty percent of the box office proceeds go toward the Imagination Library's year-round efforts.

"I always felt we owed the world a better and deeper understanding of the Imagination Library but the stars never quite aligned," Parton said in a press release. "When Nick Geidner came to us with his unique vision and talent, I knew the time had come to make this film. I am a charter member of the Dream More Club so with the help of Abramorama, Dollywood and all of our community partners, we hope to make a big splash in theaters all across the country on April 2. We have come a long way but there is so much left to do!"

Read More: Dolly Parton Says Johnny Cash Was Her First Crush

Parton was inspired to launch the Imagination Library in part because of her father.

"My dad didn't get the chance to go to school. And Daddy couldn't read and write, and that was kind of crippling to him," Parton told NPR. "He was such a smart man, though. He just had such good common sense. They call it horse sense in the country."

Parton will be featured in yet another documentary this year. Still Working 9 to 5 focuses on the cultural impact of the 1980 film 9 to 5, which starred Parton, Jane Fonda and Lily Tomlin.

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Dolly Parton's Imagination Library to be Subject of New Documentary