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Dolly Parton Raised $700K For Middle Tennessee Flood Victims

ROBYN BECK/AFP via Getty Images

Dolly Parton continued her giving ways over the weekend of Oct. 2-3 when a portion of ticket sales at her Smoky Mountain businesses benefitted flood victims in Middle Tennessee. In all, Dollywood, Dolly Parton's Stampede Dinner Attraction, Pirates Voyage Dinner & Show and Hatfield & McCoy Dinner Feud raised a total of $700,000 to be distributed by the United Way of Humphreys County.

Parton's fellow country music legend Loretta Lynn inspired the kind act back in 2016 when Lynn lent a helping hand to the "Jolene" singer's neighbors following wildfires in Sevier County, Tenn.

With the shoe on the other foot, Parton used her platform to boost Middle Tennessee flood relief efforts after the natural disaster damaged Lynn's Hurricane Mills ranch in Humphreys County and took the life of her ranch foreman, Wayne Spears.

"After the Sevier County wildfires in 2016, Loretta was one of the first who reached out to offer anything she could," Parton said in a press release. "It meant so much to me that Loretta--and so many folks--were ready to give in any way they could. This was just one small way I could help Loretta's people for all they did to help my people."

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Loretta Lynn's Friends: Hometown Rising, a Sept. 13 benefit concert at the Grand Ole Opry House for the victims of the August flood in Humphreys County, featured performances by stars the caliber of Trisha YearwoodLuke Bryan, Luke CombsGarth BrooksReba McEntireBrelandLittle Big TownBrittney Spencer and Keith Urban. The event raised nearly $1 million.

During the morning of Aug. 21, over 17 inches of rainfall caused Trace Creek to overflow, leading to catastrophic flooding in Waverly, Tenn. The Tennessean reports that almost one in 15 homes were damaged by flooding in Humphreys County, and 20 people were killed.

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Dolly Parton Raised $700K For Middle Tennessee Flood Victims